Some historical notes.

The great civilizations of antiquity such as Egyptians, Phoenicians, Romans and Arabs traded and spread the cultivation of the olive tree and its multiple uses: lighting, healing, culinary, massage, cosmetic and ends with apparent symbolism of different types in rituals and socially relevant moments. For example, the Egyptians attributed to Isis, Goddess of motherhood and birth, transmission men of this sacred tree, its form of cultivation and the use of their fruits. The olives were an important food and with its oil bodies are anointed to strengthen them, encouraging the spirit. Used also in the cult of the dead and gods. For the Phoenicians olive was also important and at the time of the collection of the olives and the oil held rites in honor to the gods as a thank you. In Greek mythology the olive tree also has a large presence. When Athena defeats Poseidon a dispute over sovereignty of Greece did creating the best work of art, and so Athena, with a spear in the ground hit, did sprout an olive tree covere[…]d fruits of which not only its fruits would be good to eat but they would be a special liquid that would serve the men food rich in flavor and energy to relieve their wounds and give strength to your body, able to give flame to light up the nights (Estrada heads: 2010).

From the Greek Islands the olive spread across the entire Mediterranean basin and came to the Romans, who also expanded its cultivation and uses of its fruits. In Sicily were known olive groves of Agrigento, where Greek olive growing systems were used. In the Roman Empire the olive oil was much appreciated, so that any citizen who planted olive trees bushels was exempted from military service. Olives were also highly valued and, thus, the poet Virgil recommended to feed on them for their excellent qualities. Roman mythology has many references to the olive tree, and the own Rome founders Romulus and Remus are considered born under the branches of this tree. Era symbol of fertility and peace, sign of Alliance between nature and man, for being the only tree that managed to survive the flood waters, representing also the immortality and strength (Estrada heads, 2010).

In the Roman Empire the olive oil was much appreciated, so that any citizen who planted olive trees bushels was exempted from military service. Olives were also highly valued and, thus, the poet Virgil recommended to feed on them for their excellent qualities.

It was hoped that, due to this long ideatico background, later appeared the olive tree as a symbol in the classical religions. For example, in the Bible, both the oil and the olive tree represents the Holy Spirit, used for anointings and reflects the abundance. It is also for the Koran, where you can read that oil shines almost without that fire touch it. In the Hebrew religion the olive has been used popularly for funeral rites, offerings and celebrations or for the creation of lamps and furniture.

While olives bones have been found in the Peninsula in Neolithic (8000-2700 a. C.) in the Alpujarras and the Garcel, the river Almanzora, seems that it was the Romans who expanded the olive tree to the Peninsula. Subsequently, with the Arab presence fields of the Valley of the Guadalquivir is enriched with new varieties, leaving important legacy as the words of acebuche, olive or oil, which comes from “to the-zait” which means (Estrada heads, 2010) olive juice.

From their final settlement in Roman times, olive has continued to increase its presence on the Peninsula, but this process has not been linear and continuous, but that there have been advances and setbacks that have been a constant presence and increasing colonization by the Olivier de all the Peninsular territories where the environmental conditions have allowed its cultivation. This link of the Peninsula with olive groves, of particular intensity in the case of Andalusia, has become so permanently, the multisecular rooting of the olive tree to the territory.

Extracted from the study: Ethnography of the olive grove of olive table Chamomile and Gordal de Sevilla.